Laira Green Primary

Key Dates

Tuesday 10th, 17th and 24th March Butterflies Outdoor Learning.

Wednesday 11th, 18th and 25th March Cherry Class Outdoor Learning.

Thursday 12th, 19th and 26th March Oak Class Outdoor Learning.

 

Home Research

How to use a compass with an OS map

Always check the weather before outdoor learning and dress to keep yourself warm and dry.

Can you find your journey to school on the map? Can you locate the allotment or Efford Valley?

 

Geography

AUTUMN 2020

Geography Field Skills

The weather affects us every day. What we wear, where we go, what we can plant to grow and eat.

Think about the four seasons. Can you name them?

What is the hottest season?

What is the coldest season?

What season are you out studying in the allotment and St Mary’s Church yard this term?

How will you need to dress to stay safe, happy and learning?

 

YR1/2 Outdoor Learning :

The Weather and how it affects us in Laira.

Human and physical geography :  identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom focus - South West (Laira)

How does our weather affect what we can grow in the allotment and when we can grow it?

SKILL PROGRESSION: Use a camera in the field to help record what has been seen.

Create plans and raw simple features in their familiar environment.

Use basic observational skills.

Ask and respond to basic geographical questions.

Use a simple picture map to move around the school (school grounds) - finding weather symbols.


YR3/4 Outdoor Learning:

Is the vegetation in our local area the same as we would find in Greece?

Can we grow the same fruit and vegetables that are grown in allotments in Greece? 

Use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies. 

Collect:

Rainfall data.

Daily temperature log.

Seasons data.

Allotment plans for 3 terms for rest of school to use.

Sketch map of vegetation in local area.

PROGRESSION SKILLS:

Follow a route on a map with some accuracy.

Create a simple scale drawing (of allotment).

Use a simple database to present findings from field work.

Select views to photograph.

Add titles and labels giving date and location information.

Consider how photo’s provide useful evidence.

Use a camera independently.

Locate the position of a photo on a map.

YR5/6 Outdoor Learning : 

Can we grow the same produce they grow in Egypt at the allotment?

Making, setting up and using a weather station at the allotment. Preparing the ground for winter planting.

Use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

PROGRESSION SKILLS:

Use 8 figure compasses.

Select appropriate methods for data collection.

Use graphs to display data collected.

Evaluate the quality of evidence collected and suggest improvements.

 

 

Spring 2020

We are continuing our outdoor learning sessions (three afternoons a term for each class).

These sessions link learning aspects of the Geography Curriculum along with improving our mental health and well-being. The sessions are also a great way to learn a variety of practical skills including map reading, learning compass directions and cooperating with others to work as a team.

Year One and Two 

Learning Objectives

Outdoor Learning is linked to the class Geography topic of recipes from the UK, and the Science topic of Animals.

Locational knowledge Name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas.

Geographical skills and fieldwork 

Use simple compass directions (North, South, East and West) and locational and directional language 

Use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features. 

We have looked at four vegetable soup recipes. One from England, one from Scotland and the other two from Wales and Northern Ireland. We found out that they all had some vegetables in common:

 

Can you name them?

 

We named and located the four countries of the UK using our atlases. Barnaby Bear helped us by showing us where his relatives lived. His Nan and Grandpa are from Plymouth!!

We learnt the capital city for each country.

In the allotment we made a field sketch of the allotment beds and then with a partner planned where we would grow our vegetables.

We had to dig and weed the beds before we could plant the seeds.

We also made a bug hotel and a bug campsite to link to our Science topic.

  

 

Year Three and Four

Learning Objectives

Describe key aspects of physical geography including rivers, mountains and the water cycle.

(Remember our learning from last term about whether or not we have a mountain in our local area. Don’t forget if you are still confused watch this clip.)

 

Use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs and digital technologies.

Use the 8 points of a compass, symbols and keys to build their knowledge of the UK and wider world.(use OS map of Dartmoor and Plymouth looking for source of River Plym - interpret symbols).

Describe and understand the distribution of natural resources including water - Burrator Reservoir.

In class we are learning all about the water cycle and rivers.  In our Outdoor Learning sessions we are studying the River Plym. We can see the River Plym from our allotment.

We looked at maps, sketches and photographs of the River Plym from where it started on Dartmoor to where it reaches the sea.

We found out that Dartmoor is where we get our drinking water from!

Session One

We went to the allotment and made a labelled sketch map of the River Plym. We then started to plan how we could make a model next week of the journey of the River Plym from Dartmoor to Plymouth Sound. We had to work as teams and collect natural materials to use for our models.

We also collected soil samples so we can compare them to the soil we find on the banks of the River Plym.

Session Two

In groups of 3 and 4 we made models of the River Plym and labelled them with key vocabulary from our River Topic. We had to work cooperatively in groups of 3 and 4 then make it 'rain' on our Dartmoor rocks so a river could flow out to our seas.

Session Three

We walked to Blagdon's Meadow to study the banks of the River Plym. We did field sketches and investigated whether there was any Dartmoor Granite among the stones and rocks. 

      

Year Five and Six

We are studying a ‘mini’ topic of Global Homes this term in Outdoor Learning to help us learn more about the world around us as well as learning the practical skills of building a woodland shelter in a team.

Learning Objectives

Use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features in its surrounding environment.

Identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle…

Use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Different homes around the world are made out of different materials according to climate, natural resources and suitability to the environment.

This house in Rwanda is made out of banana leaves:

More than 700 rivers flow across Bangladesh and travelling by boat is an everyday experience for many Bangladeshi people. Bangladesh is a low-lying country that often gets flooded so houses built near water are made out of bamboo and put on stilts.

What can you find out about different climates, environments and houses around the world?

Before Outdoor learning started:

We learnt how to draw sketch maps and designed a woodland shelter suitable for a house in the northern or southern hemisphere that has a seasonal climate with plenty of woodlands.  Some of us made model shelters to try out our ideas.

                     

 

Autumn Term 2019

All children will take part in three sessions of Outdoor Learning each term. During this time we will be covering learning objectives from the Geography Curriculum.  The children will be learning a variety of practical skills including using a compass, map reading and increasing their knowledge about where we live. We will also be visiting the school allotment for activities and tasks using field study skills.

Year One and Two

Learning Objectives:

Place Knowledge - Understand geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of a small area of the UK.

Geographical skills and field work - Use simple compass directions (N,S,E,W) and locational and directional language to describe the location and features and routes on a map.

Use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of their school and its grounds and the key human and physical features of its surrounding environment.

 Where is Bertie in this picture?

Bertie Bear is a friend of Barnaby Bear. Barnaby Bear can be found on Youtube clips using his Geography skills to explore lots of different places and countries. He is a character from a BBC programme for children and has links to KS1 resources used by the Geographical Association.

Bertie lives in Laira and has left a photograph trail for the children to follow with questions to answer along the way.

Find out how the Dragonflies get on after their first session on 12th September:

  

Following Bertie's clues and learning lots about our local environment.

After learning all about 'north, south, east and west' during a wide game we then rolled 'west' to find Bertie's next clue.

Field studies at the allotment:

We identified features in our local area:

View document yr1_list.pdf

We also started to prepare the allotment for winter planting. This meant lots of weeding!

Session 3 Investigating trees at Efford Valley 

We wanted to find out what species of tree grew in Efford Valley.

Why are trees important?

Watch this clip to remind yourselves:

 

Year Three and Four

Learning Objectives

Place Knowledge - Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the UK.

Geographical skills and fieldwork - Use 8 points of the compass, 4-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom.

Use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Session One - Following a map to Efford Valley. Using a compass and discovering how many different variety of trees can be found there.

We learnt how to read a compass. Here you can see Maple rolling down a hill to get to the west marker.

  

Using a leaf key to identify different species of trees in Efford Valley.

It needed a lot of exploring to do this task!

We identified sycamore trees, a sweet chestnut tree, hazel trees and holly. There was also a lot of ivy and fern leaves in the woods.

Session 2 at the allotment

We identified the geographical features of our local area.

We found a river, the sea, two schools, houses, woods and a bridge. We used a compass to find out what direction they were in from where we were standing.

There was a lot of discussion about mountains but everyone eventually agreed we didn't have one in our local area!

Find out what a mountain is, how mountains are formed and where to find them in this  clip:

We then weeded the allotment beds ready for winter planting.

This weed just didn't want to come up!!

Tianna found a blue, wild flower. She would like to know what it is called. Can you help her?

Year Five and Six

Learning Objectives

Place Knowledge - Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of physical geography of a region of the UK.

Geographical Skills and Fieldwork - Use the 8 points of a compass, 6 figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the UK.

Use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs and digital technologies.

Session One:

Interpreting a weather forecast and describing how the weather affects our outdoor learning session (including ground conditions in different areas).

Locating places on google maps (satellite images) and finding them on their own ordnance survey map. Marking a given route on the maps and following it to reach a destination. Understanding and using a compass (8 points).

Weather:  

Ground conditions: Rain day before therefore wet underfoot. Water not draining into soil on valley floor at bottom therefore ground saturated here.

Only slightly damp under foot in wood due to trees and bushes taking up any rainfall in the soil. Ground still porous.

Tree species identified : Birch, Hazel, Sycamore and Holly.

Session Two:

The Allotment

Weather check: We used the Met office weather data to check if we needed waterproof coats. We then looked at the forecast for next Tuesday to see what we would need to wear next week.

Ground conditions: very dry and porous

We identified key geographical features in our local environment:

Physical features - the River Plym, woodland, the sea

Human features - the railway, a bridge, houses, schools

We weren't sure about a beach but some of us said there was a small beach by Saltram. There definitely was not a mountain. 

If you are not sure about what a mountain is - check out the link further up the page.

We found compass directions for all of the features identified.

It was then time to continue the hard work of Dragonflies and Maple clearing the allotment and preparing it for winter planting.